Posts Tagged ‘atlanta’

fleet foxes at the tabernacle

May 16, 2011


Last night was my first concert of the year. And, I must say, what a show it was! The Fleet Foxes brought what might have one of the best shows I have been to, ever. I’m not just saying that because they played every song of theirs that I love, but because they played them with such enthusiasm, zeal, and humility. I cannot attest to the genuineness of their appreciation for the fans, but they often seemed to be overwhelmed by the appreciation shown by the audience.  It was as if the band was saying, “Yes we get paid to do this, but we’re still honored and humbled that you came out and supported our dreams.”

From the moment the band came on stage and until their final departure, the Fleet Foxes provided a grand evening of wonderful and energetic music. I would highly recommend the Fleet Foxes to anyone looking to have a good time and shake a leg.

Here is the setlist from the night:

  1. The Cascades
  2. Grown Ocean
  3. Drops In The River
  4. Battery Kinzie
  5. Bedouin Dress
  6. Sim Sala Bim
  7. Mykonos
  8. Your Protector
  9. Tiger Mountain Peasant Song
  10. White Winter Hymnal
  11. Ragged Wood
  12. Lorelai
  13. Montezuma
  14. He Doesn’t Know Why
  15. The Shrine / An Argument
  16. Blue Spotted Tail
  17. Blue Ridge Mountains

    Encore:
  18. Oliver James
  19. Atlanta Braves Tomahawk Chant (J. Tilman)
  20. Helplessness Blues

dalí-ng.

January 13, 2011

This past weekend I had the opportunity to visit the High Museum of Art in Atlanta for the final day of their exhibit, “Dalí: The Late Work.” Salvador Dalí is one of my favorite artists, and his Christ of Saint John of the Cross ranks right up there in my top 10 favorite art works. While, I knew the exhibit had been in town for a while, and I had made numerous attempts at planning a visit, I had not been able to get to the museum. And, even though I knew the exhibit was about Dalí, I did not know which pieces exactly would be included.

So, I made my way to Atlanta just in time to see the exhibit before it left town. As I made my way around the museum, I came across what is perhaps Dalí’s most recognizable piece, Persistence of Memory. While I did not know what to expect in the exhibit, I was a bit surprised to find this particular piece there. A friend of mine said that the piece was not there for his two previous visits. My surprise would increase as I continued to work my way through the exhibit. Most notably, around a turn, I found Christ of Saint John of the Cross hanging on a wall, staring down on me.

To fully explain my surprise, I should confess that I am not really an art connoisseur. For instance, I had no idea that Persistence of Memory was so small (9.5 in × 13 in). I also had no idea that Christ of Saint John of the Cross was so large (80.7 in × 45.67 in). Any true art lover would have known this. But, alas, I had no idea and so, not only was I not expecting these two pieces to be there, I was definitely not expecting the one to be so small and the other to be so large!

All I can say is that it is both stunning and humbling to stand in front of such a notable and large piece of art as Christ of Saint John of the Cross. I could not stop staring, which I guess is part of the point. I felt like I was viewing something that I really had no business viewing. Not that the work was above me (it most certainly was and is, however), but that the immensity of talent and scale of size really hit at something inside of me. This is not to say Persistence of Memory did not affect me similarly. No, both pieces, as well as the numerous other works that were there, are awe-inspiring. But there was something about Christ of Saint John of the Cross, which I am having a difficult time expressing at present, that really impacted me. Is this what art is all about? I cannot say. As I have tried to establish, I am no art connoisseur. What I can say is that Dalí’s works were even more amazing in person that I could have ever imagined. I hope to gaze upon them again soon.


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